The other day I was told of a bit of a horror story involving a film student director. Oddly every industry person I’ve spoken to has shared some similar tale of woe.

In this tale, actors had shown up to the shoot to discover nobody was around. The director rocked up nearly an hour late and proceeded to argue with the crew and generally was rude and defensive. Then about halfway through the scene he spat the dummy and left!

This is not the first time I have heard such tales, and it makes me wonder why it is that film schools tend to attract these prima donnas.

Clearly not all film students are like this, but so many are it raises questions about why these people are looking to make movies.

One of the most important lessons Winding City taught me about crews and cast us that you simply can’t let ego dominate. A film is the product of co-operation. Sure, there maybe one or two people driving things, but they need to be able to work well with others to get results.

I do feel that film-making is like writing- it’s not for fame, but the intent to create. Further to that, you aren’t a success if you get into film school. You are a success when you successfully make a film and the cast and crew want to come back and work with you again.

Film school provides experience, resources and contacts. Yet it sounds as if many students take these advantages for granted.

On the other hand, if you really want to make movies, you don’t need to go to school – you just need to make films.

I can only hope that I never make such a performance on set. For me, a set should be a fun place where people feel appreciated and creative. Here’s hoping that I can keep that atmosphere on my next shoot. 🙂

Conan

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